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Matchbook collectors price guide free download.Follow the Author

 

Matchbook collectors price guide free download.A collection of old matchbooks

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Navigation.Matchbox Variations values, images and numbers

 
 
Website dedicated to collecting matchbooks, matchcovers and matchboxes. The home for the Rocky Mountain Matchcover Collectors Club. There are a number of options the collector has in both buying and selling covers, more than ever with the advent of the Internet: BUYING: In the vast majority of situations, you’re going to receive exactly what you thought you bought, but you should always be guided by the adage “Let the buyer beware.” Unlike some collectible hobbies, there is little problem here with fakes. In , government safety rules decreed that friction strips must be moved from the outside-front of a matchbook to the outside back, thus obviating the need for the famous phrase “Close Cover Before Striking.” For serious phillumenists, this one act signaled the end of the era of vintage matchbook covers. Matchbooks have been around since.
 
 

Matchbook collectors price guide free download.Matchbook and matchcover collecting | Rocky Mountain Matchcover Club

Matchbox Variations values, images and numbers. The values stated in this guide are to be used only as a guide. Values are not set to determine prices as auction and dealer values vary greatly and are affected by demand and condition. The author does not assume responsibility for any losses that are the result of consulting this guide. There are a number of options the collector has in both buying and selling covers, more than ever with the advent of the Internet: BUYING: In the vast majority of situations, you’re going to receive exactly what you thought you bought, but you should always be guided by the adage “Let the buyer beware.” Unlike some collectible hobbies, there is little problem here with fakes. In , government safety rules decreed that friction strips must be moved from the outside-front of a matchbook to the outside back, thus obviating the need for the famous phrase “Close Cover Before Striking.” For serious phillumenists, this one act signaled the end of the era of vintage matchbook covers. Matchbooks have been around since.
 
 
 
 

There are a number of options the collector has in both buying and selling covers, more than ever with the advent of the Internet:. BUYING : In the vast majority of situations, you’re going to receive exactly what you thought you bought, but you should always be guided by the adage “Let the buyer beware.

What you need to watch for are:. Aside from individual collectors and non-collectors, flea markets, yard sales, and paper shows, auctions offer the largest and biggest variety of covers being offered. Ebay on the internet has rapidly become the glitziest and most talked about auction, but my own advice is to stay within the hobby auctions. On ebay, although there are lots of collectors selling there, there are also lots of non-collectors hoping to make a killing on the junk they just found in Aunt Edna’s shoe closet.

Many have no idea of what they’re selling and have no idea of the standards that collectors expect. Also, the competition is often steep. If you’re not looking for true rarities, use the hobby’s auctions and known collectors. You’ll be more than satisfied. The hobby offers a wide and steady array of ‘sanctioned’ auctions–club bulletin auctions, convention and swapfest auctions, and hobby auctions on the internet.

You can check my own auction out as an example of the latter. Prices are not set in this hobby. It always depends on who happens to be interested at the time. A price guide was published by Bill Retskin in the s, but the prices were heavily inflated, and no one in the hobby pays attention to it. There are some general guidelines that you may find, but they’re just that Current ball park figures just to give you some idea:.

Always be specific about the numbers, conditions, and age of the material you are selling. Buyers will also want to know which types you have.

It’s not necessary to do a cover-by-cover inventory. Also remember, that your covers need to be undamaged and unstruck, unless we’re talking about rarities; they don’t need to have the matches in them. Examples of unacceptable conditions include:. Be aware that sellers’ expectations are almost always far too high. There are a number of options the collector has in both buying and selling covers, more than ever with the advent of the Internet: BUYING : In the vast majority of situations, you’re going to receive exactly what you thought you bought, but you should always be guided by the adage “Let the buyer beware.

What you need to watch for are: Used and damaged covers being passed to you when you were expecting the opposite. Flats – These are salesmen’s samples; they have not been creased and stapled and are not considered collectible.

Lots of duplicates when you expected basically one of each. Current ball park figures just to give you some idea: Average, run-of-the-mill covers and this is the vast majority of material go for. Prices will be higher, of course, for the more sought-after types. To get an idea of which types these are, look at the Treasure page.

If you’re serious about collecting, your best bet, by far, is to get into the hobby–join clubs , make contacts, go to meetings, swapfests, and conventions, if possible, and trade. I’ve always found that most covers I want eventually come to me through steady trading by mail with other collectors.

And, in the process, you become much more knowledgeable about your hobby. In most cases of people trying to sell their covers, the few dollars they may get simply doesn’t justify the time and effort in trying to sell them. In that case, please consider simply donating them to either a local collector or a collector who will reimburse you postage, such as myself as long as the covers are unused and unstruck.

They’ll have a good home, and they’ll be appreciated and taken care of Examples of unacceptable conditions include: – Strikers have been cut off – Covers have been holed usually from tacks – Covers have been glued into albums – Covers have been written on – Covers are “flats” salesman’s samples; they’ve never held matches, never been in circulation Most US collectors generally do not want Canadian or other Foreign covers, and very few are interested in labels.

Ebay is time consuming, and they’re going to take a healthy slice of whatever you sell your material for. Running an ad in one of the hobby bulletins advertising what you have. Directly contacting a collector who buys collections and accumulations in their entirety: – Chester Crill , E. Woodbury Rd. Yosemite Pl.