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The collector book analysis free download.PDF Download

 

The collector book analysis free download.PDF Download

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PDF EPUB Download.Read Download The Shell Collector PDF – PDF Download

 
 
The Collector study guide contains a biography of John Fowles, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Best summary PDF, themes, and quotes. More books than ted Reading Time: 9 mins. Category: Fiction. Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW». “The Shell Collector is a beautiful story full of love, loss, and second chances.”—#1 New York Times bestselling author Debbie Macomber From USA Today bestselling author Nancy Naigle, The Shell Collector is a touching novel of a friendship that crosses generations, and learning how. Book: The Collector Author: K.R. Alexander Rating: 4 Out of 5 Stars This is another title that I got from Scholastic’s teacher points. My students reading this title around Halloween and told me that if I was a decent horror fan, then I needed to add it to my collection/5.
 
 

The collector book analysis free download.The Collector Summary and Analysis (like SparkNotes) | Free Book Notes

Book: The Collector Author: K.R. Alexander Rating: 4 Out of 5 Stars This is another title that I got from Scholastic’s teacher points. My students reading this title around Halloween and told me that if I was a decent horror fan, then I needed to add it to my collection/5. Category: Fiction. Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW». “The Shell Collector is a beautiful story full of love, loss, and second chances.”—#1 New York Times bestselling author Debbie Macomber From USA Today bestselling author Nancy Naigle, The Shell Collector is a touching novel of a friendship that crosses generations, and learning how. Summary and Analysis. FreeBookNotes found 6 sites with book summaries or analysis of The Collector. If there is a The Collector SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below. Among the summaries and analysis available for The Collector, there are 1 Full Study Guide, 2 Short Summaries and 3 Book Reviews.
 
 
 
 

John Fowles is a well-known British author — who has dedicated his life to the world of literature. Readers at large better know John Fowles for two of his most acclaimed novels. The Magus , published in , has generated the most lasting interest, becoming something of a cult novel, particularly in the United States of America.

The Collector presents the struggle of a girl who has built her own reality through memories in order to survive forced seclusion. After winning the lottery, Ferdinand Clegg, a lonely entomologist, buys a big house in the countryside and kidnaps Miranda Grey, a beautiful twenty-one years old art student with whom he has been obsessed for some time.

After a long period of preparations and observations, he forcefully brings Miranda to his own cellar, especially modified to house her for a long time.

He treats her nicely, buying all she desires in terms of food, clothes, books, music, and art. He fulfills her every need except her want to be free. He holds her captive, without any connection to the outside world, in the hope that she will eventually grow to know and love him. The book can be read as a thriller viewed, in turn, from the point of view of the two characters.

We find out that the title character, Frederick, or Ferdinand, as he prefers to be called, had a very unhappy and lonely childhood. His father dies in a car-crash when he is just two years old. After that, his mother goes off with another man. For the rest of his youth, his Aunt Annie and his Uncle Dick bring him up in the lower class suburbs of London, along with his two cousins. One of them, Mabel, whom Ferdinand dislikes taking care of, is a spastic girl who needs assistance while walking.

His other cousin goes to Australia and never sees him again, but as soon as Uncle Dick dies, he moves out and starts collecting butterflies. His decision to collect not only butterflies, but also the long admired object of his fantasy, Miranda, is made possible by the fact that he wins a large amount of money.

As a prisoner in a secluded basement, Miranda is cared for very well, and thus at first the reader has the feeling that Ferdinand is not a monster, but a pitiful, lonely man in need of love. Ferdinand thinks that money is enough to make Miranda love him. But he is wrong. However, The Collector is more than just a thriller. Frederick is unable to adapt to the modern, the real world.

He lives in a world of dreams and fantasies, unconsciously influenced by popular TV shows and movies. He believes that he can build a parallel world for himself and Miranda, where they can live happily together as husband and wife. What makes Ferdinand a dangerous character with a stubborn personality is the fact that he believes he is always right. He believes that he is doing the best thing for both Miranda and himself. He is even proud of the way he manages to kidnap the girl without leaving any trace.

Before winning the pools, he saw the world through the eyes of a man who was bullied and rejected by society. Now that he is rich, he can build his own world, a world seen through the eyes of a collector. He treats Miranda with a divine vision in mind. She is the rarest thing that a collector can ever get.

She is the pride of his collection. But he cannot understand that, in order to collect, he also has to take life. This is exactly what he does with Miranda. At first he takes away her life as a member of society and, later on, he literally lets her die.

Perhaps this is meant to signify that he lives so much in his dreamworld inside his head that his thoughts are inseparable from his speech. We are thus allowed into the mind of a captured woman who, desperate in her solitude, comes to realize her need for the company of her own captor. After she recovers from the shock of being kidnapped, she makes a deal with Ferdinand: he would release her after four weeks. During that time they talk a lot, look at art books, and she even does some painting.

At the beginning she is not allowed to see daylight, a fact that affects and changes her a lot. Her struggle to see a last ray of sun even on her death bed stands proof of how much she suffered in the dark room, illuminated only by artificial light.

During the time she is locked up, she tries several times to escape. One morning, when he opens the cellar door, she pushes so hard against it that he gets stuck between the wall and the door. Another time, when she is allowed to write a letter, she tries to put a tiny piece of paper with her location in the envelope. Later, when Ferdinand is away shopping, she tries to dig a tunnel by getting stones out of the wall.

As a last resort, she tries to seduce him, but all her attempts fail. She is a survivor. She tries to remain sane by writing about those she loves.

An important factor in her survival is the fact that she finds freedom in art. Her moments of solitude are spent in the world of art, a world dominated by the influence of her mentor. Miranda travels down the path of self-spiritual discovery, while she spends her time thinking about life and art. But the motive, his upbringing, his strong sense of values and his undying adoration of Miranda makes the reader sympathize with Frederick, too. Near the end, when the unexpected tragedy occurs, we realize the true terror of the situation and what Frederick is really made of.

In The Collector , John Fowles presents a gripping, well-written story that not only horrified me but also made me think of my own life and passions. In a way, all of us are collectors. We all have something that is dear to our heart.

Either it is stamps, books, coins, paintings or butterflies, we all tend to keep for ourselves the things that attract us most. When such passions are transformed into obsessions, the human mind builds a new reality that will suit the actions that one undertakes in order to fulfill his or her dreams. It is this kind of thrilling reality that The Collector offers us. At the begining I read 2 pages and tried to understand but later decidde to have look at the analyse of it. All the way up until she died i still sympathized with Ferdinand, I had much pity for him and little for Miranda.

I suppose I developed the bias from his perspective in the beginning of the novel, and it just stuck with me. A very good read. I think that is the reason I feel the collector dimension insanely and suffer deeply through all pages, because I do not have my own world, but I live on those made of paper and words. I cried while reading the book. I see myself as Frederick and as Miranda, to be honest I fell in love for Miranda and now I cannot sleep in peace.

They existed, no. They are just characters from a book. Miranda could not die, she did not exist, which is worse? I must find out a new book to live, a new universe to be , cause if I keep living their book, I will no longer breath.

I do not even know why I am writing, nobody hear my voice, I imagine it is a way to stay sane. I am writing to myself. Do I exist or am I in their book? Currently you have JavaScript disabled. In order to post comments, please make sure JavaScript and Cookies are enabled, and reload the page. Click here for instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your browser. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

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